Sunday, 21 April 2013

Sharing

Hollyhock flower pictures
www.treesflowers.com
Recently I received some hollyhock seeds from a fellow blogger. I like sharing through blogging. It builds trust and knowledge and friendships.

Sharing is the mantra of the kindergarten set and they do pretty well.

What happens when we are older than 5?

We share our money by donating to charity. We share our time in group efforts towards the common good. We share our knowledge and skills.

How do we respond when resources are scarce? When ownership or control bestows power and dominance. At what point does using force to get what we want become justifiable?

Would you go as far as giving up personal ownership and join a commune or eco-village? Are the people who do naive or pioneers on the cusp of change? Why do these groups often founder? When it comes down to it, is sharing beyond the scope of the human psyche?

Do we learn sharing or do we learn aggression? Is either part of our genetic code? Can we make a choice?

15 comments:

  1. Communes have always intrigued me. I think it is the community component more than anything that has always peeked my interest in the stories I have heard about communes. I think that sharing is part of who we are but when faced with certain circumstances this part of us becomes protected and guarded. So maybe sharing can be equated to love, security, and trust. We share when those things are present.

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    1. I think you're right about trust and the reasons for becoming guarded. I can understand fear but not greed.

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  2. Hi Susan,

    I hope you enjoy your hollyhock seeds! They are such beautiful flowers. Thanks for stopping by and perhaps you will photocopy those baby feet and create something with them.

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  3. Good thoughtful questions. I think when resources become limited we share - or at least I would hope that. I would think you would have to be a pretty laid back person to be able to live in a commune. And I think it probably depends upon how you were raised and how much of a competitive person you are. And you'd certainly have to have an open mind and not be afraid of change. Don't know if I would like it but lately I've thought a lot about family "communes" and how that would be - kind of like the "olden" days when families lived together and enjoyed each other's company and took care of each other.

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    1. The current way of life tends to fracture the system of family support. When I lived in Calgary there was still a sense of the pioneer spirit, everyone helping each other. I still see it as part of the code in the old ranching families.

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  4. So many questions! So few answers! I recently had a discussion with a friend about communes - in theory, they are a great idea. A tribe of your own, community spirit and support, taking advantages of strengths, etc. As long as no one wants or needs to be in charge and everyone is all harmonious, it would be great. It would be the answer to my question: How the heck will I continue with all these homesteading chores in my dotage?I think, however, egos always get in the way.

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    1. As Jill said I think you need to be laid back. As for aging I've been reading about two groups of women, one in Paris the other in Montreal, who have formed a sort of coalition to support each other. Are there enough lady homesteaders to do something similar?

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  5. Interesting questions. I think sharing is learned, and our home and community foster (or don't foster) this important attitude. I love to share information and physical things whenever I can. I hate to waste. I'm not actually homesteading, but living off the grid when I can at my float cabin comes closer than my former big city life. I have a long ways to go, but am learning new ways all the time. Thanks for stopping by and commenting on my blog about saving geraniums. I am sure having a milder than normal winter also helped. - Margy

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    1. Hi Margy, Yes I think it is learned. At some point will adaptation take place and it become instinctual?

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  6. I feel sure you will enjoy the beautiful flowers from your seeds. Sharing is a wonderful thing, but I am not sure about the force component. If one is forced, then are they really sharing.
    Laura

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    1. Exactly my point Laura. Our young people are being killed in wars right now because country A will not share with country B. Then country B decides to take it by force.

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  7. What beautiful hollyhocks. And funny, I see no rust on the leaves. Mine always have rust but I still love those gorgeous flowers.

    I think gardeners are giving people by nature. (Pun intended.) However, I grew up without any training in the giving department. Lots of training on selfishness though. Gardening has been a natural way to learn to share because not only is there lots to share but I really want others to get the same joy I get from my plants.

    Thank you for your sweet comments on my blog. I might just take you up on that offer and venture north. Cheers.

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  8. I'd like to think that we share by instinct, but I'm afraid that the truth is that we only share from our surplus - that we protect our own, by instinct, and then help others afterwards.
    I'm so glad you found my blog, as it has given me the opportunity to spend a very pleasant time rummaging around in yours! What a treat - I'm following.

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    1. I know I'm going to enjoy your blog.

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  9. Oh, I love hollyhock! It gets so dry here they fade fast in the heat. It is important to share. I am very guarded so the best way to share is online. I feel freer here.
    Hugs,
    Sherry

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