Monday, 7 April 2014

Tree Following-April

“When perfectly ripe, [it is] deliciously sweet and enticing, with rich, intense, aromatic flavour,” notes Joan Morgan, describing the Cox in The New Book of Apples. “Spicy, honeyed, nutty, pear-like… subtle blend of great complexity…”

Alas the Cox's Orange Pippin does not travel well, neither the fruit or tree. Here in North America few find success in growing it. It seems odd to miss an apple so much. For me it encapsulates a Suffolk childhood. A tree in every garden.

I didn't find the Cox's Orange Pippin on my property until after we had bought it. There are two, planted at the wrong end of the meadow, struggling in shade and waterlogged ground. It is bittersweet, the joy of an old friend, the knowledge it may not thrive.


The wrong end of the meadow


                  

Buds just coming
     


Damaged bark

                           


Last week it was professionally pruned. This week fertiliser, lime and potassium rich. Planting pollinator friendly native plants. Fingers crossed.

Pictures taken April 6 2014 as part of Loose and Leafy's Tree Following project.








19 comments:

  1. How wonderful to discover this apple variety in your garden. It will be wonderful to compare our apple trees growing at the same time in different continents during the year. Sarah x

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    1. I'm looking forward to comparing too.

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  2. Oh how exciting to have a tree with so much sentiment on your property!!! I do hope it thrives for you guys this season!!! Keep us posted friend!!! Nicole xo

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    1. It is another see how it does project.

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  3. I think that, with the knowledge you have and the care you've taken it will reward you ... we'll follow along too

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    1. I'm hoping others will share their knowledge too.

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  4. Hope it turns out well. Your property looks so lush. - Margy

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    1. some say lush, others waterlogged:)

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  5. I wonder why Cox's Orange Pippin is difficult to grow in America. It is a wonderful apple, especially fresh from the tree.
    Good luck with your tree. I can see it is going to get pampered.

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    1. I have no idea but I've read it is pretty fussy about growing conditions.

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  6. A lovely tree for you to find, I hope it grows well for you. xx

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    1. Thank you Joanne. It is a see how it does project.

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  7. How interesting to follow a tree for a year. I expect you will learn a lot.

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  8. Is that bear claw damage on the trunk? I hope the tree thrives under your good care.

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  9. Oh I do hope with your TLC the pippin apple trees thrive for you. What a wonderful find.

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    1. My days are spent in the orchard now as I try to get them back in to production. Fortunately Spring is late so I have a little time.

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  10. I do hope it revives and thrives. A proper Cox's Orange Pippin is my favourite apple - absolutely bursting with flavour and juice. I haven't eaten one for years. There are plenty of 'Coxes' each year in the shops but I don't know what kind of 'Cox' they are. They tend to be under-ripe (no rattling pips) flabby and dull. A proper Cox's Orange Pippin tastes of sunshine.

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  11. I see you are a tree follower like me. Hoping this apple tree grows well for you.

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